REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 35

Mouse models of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer


1 Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
2 Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Anatomy; Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Pathology and Microbiology; Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, College of Medicine; The Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
3 Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Anatomy, College of Medicine; The Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA

Correspondence Address:
Vimla Band
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Anatomy, College of Medicine; The Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1477-3163.91116

Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Despite advances in genetic and biochemical analyses, the incidence of breast cancer and its associated mortality remain very high. About 60 - 70% of breast cancers are Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) positive and are dependent on estrogen for growth. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have therefore provided an effective targeted therapy to treat ER-α positive breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, development of resistance to endocrine therapy is frequent and leads to cancer recurrence. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the development of ER-α positive tumors and their resistance to ER antagonists is currently limited due to lack of experimental models of ER-α positive breast cancer. In most mouse models of breast cancer, the tumors that form are typically ER-negative and independent of estrogen for their growth. However, in recent years more attention has been given to develop mouse models that develop different subtypes of breast cancers, including ER-positive tumors. In this review, we discuss the currently available mouse models that develop ER-α positive mammary tumors and their potential use to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of ER-α positive breast cancer development and endocrine resistance.


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